Lead Stories

China Has Rejected A WHO Plan For Further Investigation Into The Origins Of COVID-19

BEIJING — China cannot accept the World Health Organization's plan for the second phase of a study into the origins of COVID-19, a senior Chinese health official said Thursday. Zeng Yixin, the vice minister of the National Health Commission, said he was "rather taken aback" that the plan includes further investigation of the theory that the virus might have leaked from a Chinese lab. He dismissed the lab leak idea as a rumor that runs counter to common sense and science. "It is impossible for...

Read More

Arts and Culture

Courtesy/FWPride

Stronger Together: Community Celebrates Fort Wayne Pride

After taking a year off due to COVID-19 restrictions, the city's Pride Festival is back and bigger than ever, now a two-day event which takes place this Friday and Saturday at Headwaters Park.

Read More

State And Local News

Justin Hicks / IPB News

After Reaching Pandemic Lows, Indiana COVID-19 Cases Pick Back Up

After hitting pandemic lows for new COVID-19 cases, Indiana is seeing new spikes in infections. Wednesday was the second day in a row with more than 700 new cases reported – the highest since May 21.

Read More

WBOI Presents

Zach Bernard / WBOI News

WBOI Presents: Community Data & Priorities

On July 9, WBOI’s Zach Bernard reported on United Way of Allen County announcing a series of new strategic priorities for the community . This week on our show, we are going to hear a panel discussion organized by Andy Downs that focuses on identifying community needs, how data was collected, and where we go from here.

Read More

Corruption is usually thought to be a bad thing. But in China, the answer is no longer crystal clear.

For decades, the country's Communist Party has declared that corruption threatens its very survival. But there are signs that this is changing. Recently, the state-run media have begun arguing that corruption can't be stamped out, so it should be contained to acceptable levels. And some corruption appears to be tacitly condoned.

In response to political reforms in Myanmar — also known as Burma — the U.S. and other Western countries have eased some sanctions targeting the country's former military rulers.

But so far, one of the most powerful institutions inside the country has kept its sanctions in place. For some time, Myanmar's Buddhist clergy have effectively been on a spiritual strike by refusing to take donations from the military — a serious blow to the former regime's legitimacy.

Show up at the emergency room or your doctor's office with symptoms of a serious infection, and there's a good chance you'll get an antibiotic. You might even get a few.

But antibiotics don't work on viruses. And a particular antibiotic may be suited for one kind of germ, but not another.

It's all new for Achilles: his name, his horseshoes, the surroundings at his home near Nogales, Ariz.

"To break 'em from what they're focusing on, you want to turn 'em from one side to the next," Border Patrol agent Luis Navarro says as he carefully leads Achilles into a round training arena.

Navarro holds the mustang by a short lead, and teaches it commands to trot and to slow down.

The United States Justice Department said it will not prosecute Attorney General Eric Holder for contempt of Congress.

By a vote of 373-52, the House passed a massive bill that among other things keeps the interest rate on student loans from doubling on July 1.

"The U.S. House of Representatives passed a massive bill on Friday combining funding for transportation programs, low-interest student loans, and the National Flood Insurance Program," the Reuters reports.

The Washington Post reports:

Conservative critics who say that Chief Justice John Roberts is some kind of traitor to their movement because he was the deciding vote in favor of upholding the Obama administration's Affordable Care Act "don't understand how these judges are supposed to discharge their responsibilities," Bush-era Attorney General Alberto Gonzales told NPR this morning.

Heinlein, Asimov and Bradbury; they were the tripod (invasive, moving, with lasers) on which my science fiction education was built in the 1970s. This was somewhat self-selected, because once you — or I — grew out of Danny Dunn and Journey to the Mushroom Planet and Tom Swift, Jr., they were the inevitable destinations, the planets with the heaviest gravity wells in the sci-fi solar system.

The next installment in NPR's Backseat Book Club heads back to where this all started: Diary of a Wimpy Kid, by Jeff Kinney. It was our 2009 interview with Kinney that sparked the idea for a special book club dedicated to kids. On the day before Kinney arrived at our studios, we asked our youngest listeners to send us the questions they would put to the author of the blockbuster series. We were floored by the response. An avalanche of emails hit our inbox from kids all over the country.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Behind Mitt Romney in the New Hampshire polls comes Ron Paul, and then several men battling for third. Including Jon Huntsman, the former Utah governor and ambassador to China.

Pages

Support 89.1 WBOI and 94.1 WBNI

Update Your Monthly Gift

2021 Wine Dinner Tickets and Information

Get News Updates

Partnering With

Additional Support Provided By