agriculture

Courtesy / Wikimedia Commons

Purdue agriculture experts say the crop report released Tuesday projects potential record highs for corn and soybeans, and experts say that’s good news for Hoosiers at the grocery store.

Indiana farmers are projected to harvest a little more than one billion bushels of corn this year, which would set a record for the second consecutive year.  The predicted soybean harvest would be the third-largest in state history and up nearly six percent from last year. 

Courtesy / Wikimedia Commons

U.S. Sen. Joe Donnelly says the new Farm Bill is good legislation for the times the nation is facing.  Donnelly is traveling around the state this week talking to farmers about the bill.

Donnelly says the most recent version of the farm bill is strong in two important areas: a greater shift toward crop insurance and greater focus on conservation. 

The Indiana Democrat says past farm bills relied heavily on direct payments to farmers; the new bill does away with them almost entirely, which he says is better for taxpayers as well as farmers.

Courtesy / IPCC.ch

The Midwest is likely to experience more flash floods because of climate change. That’s one of the takeaways from the United Nation’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report released Monday. That could affect how cities think about their infrastructure and how farmers manage their crops.

Research indicates Indiana and other Midwestern states may not see more rainfall—it will just come in shorter, more intense bursts.

Amber Recker / For WBOI News

The locavore movement is starting to take hold in Northeast Indiana, as is evident by the growing popularity of farmers markets. We want to know where our food is grown and raised. When you buy produce from the grocery store, you don’t know where or by whom it was grown.

More Crop Production Means Lower Food Costs

Jan 17, 2014

Consumers have seen high food prices because of crop shortages and dry weather across the country for the past few years. But that’s expected to change in 2014.

Indiana farmers produced a record amount of corn in 2013. Along with high soybean yields, that will likely mean cheaper food prices this year.     

Chris Hurt is an agricultural economist at Purdue University. He says that food supply is finally catching up to demand, and that’s good news for consumers.  

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