General Election 2020

Lauren Chapman / IPB News

Hoosiers across the state are receiving unsolicited absentee ballot applications in the mail from the Indiana Democratic and Republican parties.

Justin Hicks / IPB News

Indiana Secretary of State Connie Lawson insists the state will have a “normal election” this fall and won’t expand mail-in voting amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

Jay Phagan / Flickr

A federal judge struck down an Indiana law that tried to more quickly – and illegally – purge people from its voter rolls.

Lauren Chapman / IPB News

Indiana counties can no longer reject a voter’s absentee, mail-in ballot because an official says their signature doesn’t match – without giving the voter a chance to fix it.

Justin Hicks / IPB News

A federal judge won’t force Indiana to expand vote-by-mail for this fall’s election.

Screenshot of a Zoom call

At a remote, video meeting of the Indiana Election Commission Friday, Republicans again rejected an attempt to expand vote-by-mail for this year’s general election.

Daniel Morrison / Flickr

The fight over vote-by-mail continues in Indiana as Gov. Eric Holcomb and Republicans remain opposed to expanding the system for this year’s fall election.

Jessica Whittle Photography / Flickr

Former Indiana Lt. Gov. John Mutz, a Republican, says pressure from President Donald Trump is the reason Gov. Eric Holcomb won’t allow many Hoosiers to vote by mail this fall.

Justin Hicks / IPB News

Common Cause Indiana and the Indiana NAACP are suing Indiana in federal court over what they say is its “unjustifiably early” deadline to return absentee vote-by-mail ballots.

Lauren Chapman / IPB News

It’s currently unlikely Hoosiers will have access to expanded vote-by-mail for this fall’s general election.

Republican leaders aren’t endorsing it after using it in the primary.

Concerns around COVID-19 prompted Indiana leaders to allow any Hoosier who wanted one to get a vote-by-mail ballot this year. And around 500,000 more people did so than in the 2018 or 2016 primaries. Democratic leaders like state party chair John Zody say that’s why it’s needed in November.

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