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Legislative leaders to look at high health care costs, but say past legislation still needs time

Rodric Bray, Senate President Pro Tem, speaking into a microphone.
Brandon Smith
/
IPB News
Senate President Pro Tem Rodric Bray (R-Martinsville) said the recommendations coming out of the Health Care Cost Oversight Task Force may result in some “tweaks” to make health care more affordable.

Lawmakers said they're eyeing solutions to Indiana's high health care costs when the legislative session starts in January. But leaders also said they want to give more time to the solutions they've passed in recent years.

Senate President Pro Tem Rodric Bray (R-Martinsville) said the recommendations coming out of the Health Care Cost Oversight Task Force may result in some “tweaks” to make health care more affordable.

“It's something that I can assure you that I think the leadership up here in front of you has on their priority, frankly, on both sides of the aisle,” Bray said. “And we're going to continue to watch it very closely.”

READ MORE: Indiana legislative leaders temper expectations of major action in 2024 session

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However, Bray said legislation from previous sessions needs more time to have a positive impact on the state’s high health care costs.

“This is a problem that didn't get here overnight,” Bray said. “It's a problem that's not going to go away overnight.”

Bray said previous legislation includes the creation of the All Payer Claims Database and a ban on non-compete agreements for some physicians.

Indiana is the seventh most expensive state for hospital costs according to a study by the RAND Corporation.

Abigail is our health reporter. Contact them at aruhman@wboi.org.

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Abigail Ruhman covers statewide health issues. Previously, they were a reporter for KBIA, the public radio station in Columbia, Missouri. Ruhman graduated from the University of Missouri School of Journalism.