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We, The Voters — The Left. The Right. The Disillusioned.

Photos by Ash Ponders/NPR, Hannah Yoon/NPR, Justin Sullivan/Getty & Chip Somodevilla/Getty. Collage by Jackie Lay/NPR

Updated April 29, 2024 at 09:29 AM ET

What do you want from your government?

It's a question that speaks to the core of our country. In a presidential election year it comes up a lot.

For the next three months NPR will dig into the matters you've signaled are most important to you when choosing a leader with outsized power to shape the issues and the results. Consistently top of mind for NPR listeners and readers are the often complicated questions related to gun violence, the economy, immigration, reproductive rights, healthcare, and U.S. foreign policy.

NPR's specialty is our ability to deliver local, national and international perspectives in partnership with Member stations in cities and towns, large and small and across the political spectrum. We work hard to fairly present differing viewpoints that provide a complete picture. Our hope? That our rigorous and respectful reporting spurs meaningful conversations within our broadcast programs, on our site and podcasts and at dinner tables across the land that help you decide what's right for you, your family and your community.


Project Schedule

Gun Violence
Economy
Immigration
Abortion and Reproductive Rightsthis week
Health Careweek of June 3
Foreign Policy week of June 20


This Week: May 20-24

Abortion and Reproductive Rights

This week, NPR will be bringing you stories about abortion and reproductive rights across the United States. From a look at where the issue will be on the ballot come November, to "abortion deserts," to where the presidential candidates stand.

Demonstrators gather in front of the U.S. Supreme Court as the justices hear arguments in Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health case in 2021.
Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images
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Getty Images
Demonstrators gather in front of the U.S. Supreme Court as the justices hear arguments in Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health case in 2021.

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The states where abortion bans, lawsuits and ballot measures may feature in November — Since Roe v. Wade was overturned, state laws on abortion have been changing constantly. It will all be part of the picture as voters go to the polls in November.

Republicans try to soften stance on abortion as 'abolitionists' go farther — Activists who describe themselves as "abortion abolitionists" want to charge women who have abortions with homicide and ban the fertility treatment known as IVF, saying life begins at conception.

How political stances on abortion have shifted — for Biden, Trump and voters — Abortion rights are top of mind for many voters as November's presidential election approaches. So how have Joe Biden and Donald Trump approached the topic?


Previous Coverage

Immigration

Ãlvaro Enciso places crosses at sites where migrants are known to have died in the borderland, this cross represents the death of Nolberto Torres-Zayas just east of Arivaca, Arizona on Wednesday, March 27, 2024. Torres-Zayas died of hyperthermia in 2009, not far from a Humane Borders water cache that had been vandalized and drained.
Ash Ponders / Ash Ponders for NPR
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Ash Ponders for NPR
Ãlvaro Enciso places crosses at sites where migrants are known to have died in the borderland, this cross represents the death of Nolberto Torres-Zayas just east of Arivaca, Arizona on Wednesday, March 27, 2024. Torres-Zayas died of hyperthermia in 2009, not far from a Humane Borders water cache that had been vandalized and drained.

NPR brings you stories about immigration reported from the U.S.-Mexico border. We explore the experiences of various voices navigating the complex issue and its effects on individuals, families, cities and the nation.

Is it easy for migrants to enter the U.S.? We went to the border to find out Morning Edition spoke to migrants hoping to enter the U.S. and the border agents tasked with keeping them out.

How a U.S. Customs and Border Protection veteran sees his agency's mission — Ryan Riccucci, a 17-year agency veteran, says he feels the agency is misunderstood by the U.S. public.

Migrants claiming asylum can be allowed into the U.S. Here's how it works — Asylum rules in the U.S. paired with millions of cases backing up immigration courts are causing a major headache for the country.

Migrant crime is politically charged, but the reality is more complicated — Republicans have raised the alarm about a migrant crime wave. Nationally, crime is down even as immigration has surged, but the concerns are real in some neighborhoods.

Is Biden's border plan working? Here's how the top immigration official says it is — Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas sat with Morning Edition to discuss the president's approach to migrant arrivals and where he feels the strategy has worked.

What Arizona's Mexico-born Republican congressman thinks of the border situation — As part of the "We, The Voters" series exploring immigration, we meet Republican Rep. Juan Ciscomani, a Mexican American representing Arizona's Sixth Congressional District.

Economy

Four voters share their view of the U.S. economy.
/ Courtesy of Arch City Defenders, Winton Machine Company, Bhavesh Patel and the Just One Project
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Courtesy of Arch City Defenders, Winton Machine Company, Bhavesh Patel and the Just One Project
Four voters share their view of the U.S. economy.

When it comes to the economy, voter sentiment is shaped by more than just the data. Join us this week as we explore some of the "kitchen table" issues that are influencing voters this election year, from access to affordable housing, to food prices and student debt.

Four 'American Indicators' share their view of the U.S. economy — and their politics — The economy is a top voting issue for many Americans. Four "American Indicators," people reflecting different sectors of the economy in different parts of the country, talk about their politics.

Housing experts say there just aren't enough homes in the U.S. — The United States is millions of homes short of demand, and lacks enough affordable housing units. And many Americans feel like housing costs are eating up too much of their take-home pay.

The disconnect between facts and feelings when it comes to voters and the economy — Why is there a disconnect at times between good news about the economy, and how voters actually feel about the economy? And how is that likely to play out in the 2024 election?

Why experts say inflation is relatively low but voters feel differently — Grocery prices are a key component of any household budget, and rising food prices can sour the electorate's mood.

The latest on student debt relief — and how young voters are feeling about it — A look at where things stand on student loan forgiveness — and how Republicans and Democrats differ on whether to offer debt relief to student borrowers.

Gun Violence

Tanya Warden, 55, sits for a portrait at her workplace in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on March 26, 2024. Warden's son, Tyron Alexander, was shot multiple times and died in October 2020.
Hannah Yoon / Hannah Yoon for NPR
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Hannah Yoon for NPR
Tanya Warden, 55, sits for a portrait at her workplace in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on March 26, 2024. Warden's son, Tyron Alexander, was shot multiple times and died in October 2020.

The U.S. has the 28th-highest rate of deaths from gun violence in the world — with 4.31 deaths per 100,000 people in 2021. And for our first week of our We, The Voters series, join NPR as we explore gun violence in the U.S. and its impact on communities across the nation.

Philadelphia gun violence victims find support through residents and nonprofits — As gun violence spiked in Philadelphia after the pandemic, some residents and nonprofits banded together to help victims.

Suicides make up majority of gun deaths, but remain overlooked in gun violence debate — Suicide is the leading cause of gun-related deaths in the United States. But it's often only an afterthought in the public debate about gun violence.

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