Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
0:00 0:00
Available On Air Stations
Underwriter Message

Policymakers call for FSSA to pause proposed Medicaid cuts after budget shortfall

Representative Ed Clere in a black suit with a white dress shirt and red tie speaking at a microphone.
Lauren Chapman
/
IPB News
Rep. Ed Clere (R-New Albany), a member of the Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Task Force, said he is concerned about the lack of transparency from FSSA around the data used to make these decisions.

The lieutenant governor and several lawmakers have called for the Family and Social Services Administration to “pause” proposed cuts. The proposed cuts would affect caregivers providing attendant care as “legally responsible individuals.”

During the COVID-19 public health emergency, FSSA allowed legally responsible individuals — usually parents of children with disabilities — to provide care typically provided by home health aides due to workforce shortages. It recently announced this would no longer be allowed following a $1 billion shortfall in the Medicaid budget. FSSA says it will work with families using this kind of care to transition to other avenues of care before the change goes into effect July 1.

Lt. Gov. Suzanne Crouch, the leader of the state’s Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Task Force, said FSSA should pause the implementation of the changes.

“I've heard we're trying to get information,” Crouch said. “I've heard we're going to adjust. I've heard no data. I've heard we're working on it. At this point in time until these questions can be answered, I would call upon FSSA to pause.”

READ MORE: Dozens protest proposed Medicaid changes that would end payment for parents of kids with disabilities

Join the conversation and sign up for the Indiana Two-Way. Text "Indiana" to 765-275-1120. Your comments and questions in response to our weekly text help us find the answers you need on statewide issues.

Rep. Ed Clere (R-New Albany), another member of the Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Task Force, said he is concerned about the lack of transparency from FSSA around the data used to make these decisions.

“I find it hard to believe that FSSA didn't have the data I've requested prior to announcing the so-called sustainability measure,” Clere said. “So I'm disappointed that it hasn't been provided to me and it's not being provided to other members of the task force or members of the public.”

Three sitting lawmakers agreed with Crouch’s call to pause and asked for more transparency from FSSA on how these decisions were made and how access to services might be affected.

FSSA also proposed other changes to address the shortfall, including ending retroactive coverage while Medicaid eligibility is pending and pausing the rate indexing across Medicaid services.

Abigail is our health reporter. Contact them at aruhman@wboi.org.

Tags
Abigail Ruhman covers statewide health issues. Previously, they were a reporter for KBIA, the public radio station in Columbia, Missouri. Ruhman graduated from the University of Missouri School of Journalism.