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Highway work zone speed cameras likely deployed in Indiana in late summer, early fall

Vehicles drive down a highway in a construction zone, with orange barrels lining the roadway.
WFIU/WTIU
Indiana's highway work zone speed camera pilot program will limit the cameras to four work zones across the state.

Speed cameras in a few highway work zones around Indiana are expected to arrive in late summer or early fall.

The Indiana General Assembly created the pilot program in 2023. The Indiana Department of Transportation said implementation in other states with similar programs typically took between 12 and 18 months.

INDOT said it’s working through that process now, which includes hiring personnel to administer it, contracting with an outside vendor and selecting sites where the cameras will be deployed.

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The legislation, HEA 1015, only allows cameras at four work zones across the state. INDOT says it will consider crash data, average speeds and traffic volume when choosing the sites.

Under the law, police could issue speeding tickets to those captured on camera going at least 11 miles per hour over the limit when workers are present. The first offense would come with a warning; the second would be a $75 fine. And it would be $150 for every ticket after that.

Brandon is our Statehouse bureau chief. Contact him at bsmith@ipbs.org or follow him on Twitter at @brandonjsmith5.

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Brandon Smith has covered the Statehouse for Indiana Public Broadcasting for more than a decade, spanning three governors and a dozen legislative sessions. He's also the host of Indiana Week in Review, a weekly political and policy discussion program seen and heard across the state. He previously worked at KBIA in Columbia, Missouri and WSPY in Plano, Illinois. His first job in radio was in another state capitol - Jefferson City, Missouri - as a reporter for three stations around the Show-Me State.